From The Judge’s Chair…What Happened With Sam Mikulak’s Floor?

 

If you happened to watch Sam Mikulak’s floor routine from the Pacific Rim Championships and saw his final score of 14.55 with a D-score of 5.7, you were probably very confused.  His routine was packed with difficulty and, aside from the easy double full dismount, appeared to have everything it needed for a D-score well above 6.0.

 

Sam Mikulak Floor 2012 Pacific Rim Championships Team Finals

 

Let’s take a look at what probably happened.  The calculation below shows his intended D-score:

Difficulty and Connection Points

Skill

Value

Points

Double-Double

E

0.5

Back 1 ½

C

0.3

+

0.1 connection

Front full twisting 1 ¾

D

0.4

Wide arm press

C

0.3 *see below

Front double full

D

0.4

+

0.1 connection

Front full

C

0.3

Back 2 ½

D

0.4

+

0.1 connection

Front 1 ½

C

0.3

Whip back

B

Not needed for difficulty

+

0.1 connection

Tucked Thomas

D

0.4

Back double full

C

0.3

Total Difficulty/Connection

 

4.0

 

 

 

 



Element Groups:

 

Element Group

Point Value

EG 1: Non-acrobatic skills

0.5

EG 2: Forward Acro Skills

0.5

EG 3: Backward Acro Skills

0.5

EG 4: Sideways/Arabian Skills

0.5

EG 5: Dismount (at least D value for the full 0.5 credit; a C value gives 0.3 points)

0.5

 

The wide-arm press handstand fulfills EG 1.

The front full twisting 1 3/4 fulfills EG 2.

The double-double fulfills EG 3.

The Thomas fulfills EG 4.

The back double full partially fulfills EG 5 (0.3 instead of 0.5)

 

Total Element Group Points: 2.3

 

Total Expected D-Score = 4.0 + 2.3 = 6.3

 

He was given a 5.7 instead.  What happened?

 

I believe he didn’t get credit for the wide-arm press handstand.  To get credit, he must hold it for at least one second (although there would be a deduction).  For no deduction, he must hold it at least 2 seconds.  If you watch closely, he has a slight arm bend and struggle while trying to hold it, giving the impression that it never stopped completely for at least one second.  Personally, I would have counted this and taken a deduction rather than taking away credit altogether, but I can see how this was certainly questionable.

 

If we take away the value of this skill, he then counts the whip back for difficulty instead (loses 0.1 for counting a B instead of a C), and he loses the 0.5 for the element group altogether.  Note he does not have another “nonacrobatic skill” to count for element group 1.  If we take away these 6 tenths, the D-score drops from a 6.3 to a 5.7.  Make sense?

 

Not holding a wide-arm press can be an extremely costly mistake, especially if it’s your only non-acrobatic skill.  The tumbling is absolutely fantastic, and I love his overall look here – clean, sharp, and well-presented.  Hopefully Mikulak won’t make this unfortunate mistake again, and we can see this routine score well into the mid-15’s.  I also fully expect he’ll upgrade that dismount to a D skill and gain 0.3 more tenths, giving him a D-score of 6.6.  That’s what he’ll need to prove he can challenge Dalton or Legendre for a spot in Team USA’s Olympic floor lineup.

 

 

More to come on Mikulak, Dalton, and Brooks in my next blog.

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